De-Scooped

When I bought the bus, it came with side scoops cut-in by one of the previous owners. I wasn’t keen on them, but figured they couldn’t hurt. Besides, it would be quite a bit of work to repair.

I was wrong on the first part, and correct on the second part.

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I’m pretty sure the side-scoops did let the engine run a little cooler. But, they also rammed dirt into the engine compartment every time we were off-pavement (which was often). The dusty air going into the engine surely caused more harm than running (slightly) cooler helped.

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For me, this was pretty much an all-day task. Part of it included re-wiring my brother’s garage for 220VAC for the MIG.

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11 thoughts on “De-Scooped

  • September 24, 2013 at 7:58 AM
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    I again suggest you add TWO pairs of plastic scoop extensions (bonded together, two becoming one thick, strong scoop) to the upper entrance. Check out the physics, more free ram effect, less power robbing and heating PLUS high enough to avoid most wheel thrown dirt. Also a good time to change to a real carb/manifold setup for better all around running. Also the fulcrum pin for the 90 degree steering link should be checked and replaced if at all worn. I have several extra. I drilled and installed a zirc in the middle lower of my shifter tube for lubing the shifter shaft-helps a bunch. Check out or replace the plastic/micarta coupler for the shaft at the tranny end AND the nylon insert on the forward end to tighten up overall shifting. Do not forget dual rear rubber mounts for engine hanging and front mount for tranny if not newish. I had an engine fall out off road once so I know! Chirco should have anything you need if I do not have it. PS- when done with welding sheet metal try to spray rubber undercoating on the bottom/underside to keep future corrosion out. Good luck! rusty PSS– A good time to go on the net and get a set of Bilsteins all around- you will never regret it and so happy your butt and kidneys will be!

  • September 24, 2013 at 8:00 AM
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    Rusty – thanks for all the tips – more for my list! I think I’ll hold off on the upper custom scoop until it really becomes necessary – it sounds like something that could be jury-rigged and bolted on anywhere.

    care to elaborate on the real manifold/carb setup? I’m currently running the dual baby Weber ICTs, but am open for suggestion. I’ve considered going back to stock.

    The rust-proofing is turning into a huge task, so that’s where I’m currently stuck. I’ve heard mixed opinions on undercoating. It either a) prevents moisture and prevents rust or b) traps moisture and accelerates rust. 😉

    Also, I’ve been generously gifted a full set of KYB adjustable shocks, so those are going in soon…

  • September 24, 2013 at 8:04 AM
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    Nice work, how’s MIG welding on bus sheetmetal? I found my beetle so thin that blowing through was a constant worry.

    Re: Above comment no doubt you are having to make some judgement calls on what is necessary to continue and what will pull you into a full restoration. Good luck!

  • September 24, 2013 at 8:21 AM
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    Doug – it’s tough, but could be better with a different set up. My brother’s MIG currently doesn’t have gas, so it splatters and is messy. But, nothing a grinder can’t fix. The other issue is the lowest power setting – it just doesn’t go low enough for very thin sheet metal. So, you’ve got to go slow and have lots of patience. Still, it can be done.

    Also, keep in mind, I’m no welder. I did set my shirt on fire… but, at least I was wearing shoes.

  • September 24, 2013 at 8:32 AM
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    …and Angela would be keen on hearing if anyone has a usable passenger seat frame (bottom half at least) to donate. None of our previous spring repairs have held up…

  • September 24, 2013 at 8:47 AM
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    Let’s see, when Red Beard was designed Volkswagen was employing dozens (at least) of engineering PhDs and in 1968 they decided to, among other things, move the Type 2 air intakes from down low to up high. Apparently it was for two reasons: ingestion of dust/dirt, and that air two feet above the road is hotter than air six and-a-half feet above the road. So up the intakes went.

    Anyone who thinks scoops are gonna help needs to explain how they know the principles of ACVW engine cooling better than those dozens of engineering PhDs. The cooling air doesn’t get to the engine by any “ram effect” in any case; it’s entirely dependent upon the fan’s speed.

    Alright,
    Mitch.

  • September 24, 2013 at 9:03 AM
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    Mitch –

    “Ramming” air in will increase volumetric flow rate and result in a decreased engine temp (regardless of the fan rotation rate – by increasing stagnation pressure at the intake inlet). Still, since I’m usually driving in the lower subsonic regime, the effect isn’t huge*.

    The gist is, if you want to take steps to make it run cooler – you can. But taking the steps needed to do it properly will… make the car look ugly. And, it’s not really necessary for normal operating conditions. If VW had a systematic design problem, they’d probably be better off with a bigger fan. But, they didn’t have a problem. Their engineers converged on a cost/effectiveness design that worked well enough and went with it.

    So, I finally welded over the the custom scoops the PO had installed. And, have no plans of adding any custom mods… at least until I attempt to cross the Sahara.

    *yes, I pulled the aero. eng. PhD card

  • September 24, 2013 at 2:23 PM
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    think about this…. if you take your head out of a moving car at 60 mp/h… can you breath more than when the car is not moving?

    the answer is NO.. your nose is going to take the air that it needs, no more no less..

    if the engine need more air… do you think that German Engineers wouldn’t put the scoops in the original design?

  • September 26, 2013 at 6:59 AM
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    I like the 34 pict3 or 2 new Bocar gas (not ethanol) with the center tap manifold for power brakes. I believe KYBs are self adjusting, not adjustable. I have had great success with them BUT did not use the stock ones, used the gas-adjust white body ones for a dodge 4by ( check for correct OAL) in the rear to keep the weight off the bars and tighten the ride up. Use same specs for OEM replacements and then find heavier ones with same specs and mounts. Do not forget a new dist with new breakerless setup! R

  • September 30, 2013 at 10:24 AM
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    Jason,
    Have you tried the spring fix I recommend a while back?

  • September 30, 2013 at 5:36 PM
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    i had to try a different fix… more coming…

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